Data Quality in Eye Tracking and Translation Studies Research

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June 11, 2018 

Aston University, Birmingham, UK

During the last three decades, translation and interpreting researchers have become interested in using behavioral measures to explore the production and reception of translations. To do this, Translation Studies scholars have relied on neighboring areas to borrow experimental methods that would allow them to test their emerging hypotheses (O’Brien 2013).

Empirical research has consolidated as a solid field in translation and interpreting, and eye tracking is perhaps one of the most popular methods adopted by translation researchers. The potential eye tracking has and its capacity to provide online data to scrutinize the production and reception processes have attracted the attention of researchers both in audiovisual translation and translation process research.

 However, the application of empirical methods in general, and eye tracking in particular, from well-established fields to translation and interpreting research is not without problems. These methods offer large amounts of data which are hard to process, manipulate and interpret without the proper expertise. As a result, the lack of a common framework, methodological standardization, and rigor in processing these data might result in the cumbersome manual processing producing inconsistent or hardly generalizable results.

This event focuses on good practices in data management. It will discuss common problems and possible solutions that aim at strengthening empirical translation research. By specifically addressing methodological issues, the event will provide post-graduate and PhD students as well as early-career and experienced researchers with a practical overview of eye-tracking research in Translation Studies.

Invited speakers

Programme

  • 10:00 - 10:20 Registration
  • 10:20 - 10:30 Opening Remarks
  • 10:30 - 11:30 Carlos Teixeira: Overcoming methodological challenges of eye tracking in the translation workplace
  • 11:30 - 12:30 Agnieszka Szarkowska: Using eye tracking to study subtitling - the dos and don'ts
  • 12:30 - 1:30 Lunch break
  • 1:30 - 2:30 Annegret Sturm: Eye + Mind = I?
  • 2:30 - 3:30 Jan-Louis Kruger: The development of eye tracking in empirical translation research: From data quality to statistical analysis
  • 3:30 - 3:45 Coffee Break
  • 3:45 - 4:45 Round table

Attendance is free but registration is mandatory through Eventbrite.

The conference will be followed by the workshop “Processing Eye-Tracking Data in Translation Studies Research”. Participation in the workshop is free, but places are limited. Please check the details and contact the organiser if you have any question.

Twitter: @AstonTS with the support of @AstonLSS and @ClaRAatAston